Our home: 225 Warren Street, Newark, NJ

Our Faculty

Former PHRI Directors

Education: weekly lectures and graduate teaching

The mass spectrometry laboratory

No research can be conducted without support

The ICPH building, inside and out

Our scientists: engaged in multidisciplinary studies

Welcome to PHRI

As today’s biomedical advances occur at a dizzying pace, the Public Health Research Institute pursues its research mission to help eliminate the infectious diseases spreading across the planet.

Founded in 1942 in New York City by legendary Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, PHRI has been home to seminal discoveries in biomedical sciences. Hosted in the ICPH building in Newark, NJ, since 2002, PHRI became part of the New Jersey Medical School in 2006 and joined Rutgers University in 2013.

For almost 80 years, PHRI has fostered a culture of international talent, a collaborative environment, and the mentoring of young scientists. Today, PHRI remains committed to the pursuit of excellence in research and learning.

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NEWS & EVENTS


05-21-19

Four postdoctoral opportunities are available at PHRI. One in the laboratory of Dr. Gennaro to study macrophage lipid metabolism in tuberculosis, one in the laboratory of Dr. Chang to study host-pathogen interactions related to HIV pathogenesis, one in the laboratory of Dr. Kim to study the Trypanosoma brucei genome and its epigenome integrity, and one in the laboratory Dr. Xue to study fungal pathogenesis. For details, visit Open Positions.

04-12-19

LaTasha Fraser, doctoral candidate in the laboratory of Sanjay Tyagi, successfully defended her Ph.D. dissertation, “Exploring the Role of Chromatin Decondensation at a Gene Locus in Stochastic Gene Expression”.

04-05-19

Dr. Xilin Zhao’s group published a paper in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences USA that revealed a fundamental aspect of antibiotic action: the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by bacteria in response to severe stress is self-amplifying. Once a threshold is passed, the damage caused by ROS stimulates the production of more ROS; death is inevitable. The work also showed unequivocally that ROS arising from antimicrobial treatment causes death rather than being an incidental side-product. The conclusions emerged from the popular misconception that bacteria are thought to be dead at the time they are plated on agar to measure survival following antibiotic treatment: they can actually still be alive, dying on the drug-free agar plates due to self-amplifying ROS accumulation. This work should have a major impact on our understanding of how bacteria die in response to diverse types of lethal insult. The paper can be accessed at: www.pnas.org

Welcome to PHRI

As today’s biomedical advances occur at a dizzying pace, the Public Health Research Institute pursues its research mission to help eliminate the infectious diseases spreading across the planet.

Founded in 1942 in New York City by legendary Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, PHRI has been home to seminal discoveries in biomedical sciences. Hosted in the ICPH building in Newark, NJ, since 2002, PHRI became part of the New Jersey Medical School in 2006 and joined Rutgers University in 2013.

For almost 80 years, PHRI has fostered a culture of international talent, a collaborative environment, and the mentoring of young scientists. Today, PHRI remains committed to the pursuit of excellence in research and learning.

LEARN MORE